Category Archives: Ted Rollins Sustainability

Campus Crest Collaborates with Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore

When Campus Crest acquired an existing property near the OSU campus in Stillwater, OK, the firm knew a major interior renovation would be required to bring the property in line with its existing portfolio.

This presented a new opportunity for collaboration with the local community and Campus Crest Communities, Stillwater Habitat for Humanity, Stillwater Public Schools, Oklahoma State University and North American Van Lines who collaborated to execute the largest donation to date for the Stillwater Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore.

Stillwater_river_habitatThe donation was valued at well over $100,000 in ReStore value and included Campus Crest donated household items from more than 135 apartments, including refrigerators, microwaves, dishwashers, washers, dryers, couches, coffee tables, dining room sets and other miscellaneous items.

“Reuse of existing furniture and appliances not only reduces demand of virgin material but also provides quality goods at an accessible price point for those who cannot afford to purchase new,” said Ted Rollins, co-founder and CEO of Campus Crest Communities.

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Campus Crest Initiative to Recycle Donated “Dead” Electronics

Electronics recycling is important to decrease contamination of our landfills, while also maximizing the reuse of non-renewable resources. Unfortunately, electronics recycling is generally not easy to do, and the importance is often unknown.

To increase awareness, The Grove properties and Campus Crest Corporate participated in the first annual Donate the Dead E-waste Drive, collecting 994 items, ranging from cellphones, receivers, remote controls, and computers. recycle electoronics

Once the competition was over, each property manager contacted their local recycling center to properly salvage these goods. This winner of this educational event was The Grove Moscow property, located in Moscow, Idaho.

“We seek to decrease toxic materials in landfills and maximize reuse/recycling of non-renewable resources,” said Ted Rollins, co-founder and CEO of Campus Crest Communities. “From a social perspective, we want to inform residents about the importance of electronics recycling and tangible ways to properly dispose of these items at the end of their useful life.”

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Ted Rollins tests green living programs on campus

Articulating the connection between why green decision-making is valuable, what the resident will gain from it, and how their decisions are making positive impact is key to ensuring buy-in and resident engagement.

“We help our residents grow in their understanding of green living by equipping them with resources to inform daily decisions so they can easily choose green, said Ted Rollins, chief executive officer of Campus Crest Communities.Ted-Rollins-recycle

In 2012, Campus Crest partnered with the Institute for the Built Environment at Colorado State University to create resident resources and pilot test the effectiveness of programs.

“In 2013, we are rolling out these programs at every property and feedback will be achieved through resident focus groups,” said Rollins.

Events implemented to pilot test these concepts have been:

• Week of Wow

• Green Cleaning Galore

• Green Grocery Bingo

• Grove Eco Footprint Survey

“Our green events and resources inform residents about topics such as decreasing utility consumption, product reuse, recycling and waste minimization, alternative transportation, green cleaning products, and local purchasing choices,” said Rollins.

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Ted Rollins to offset electricity consumption by 50 percent on his properties

In a partnership with SolarCity, Campus Crest Communities is installing nearly 10,000 solar panels on its student housing communities in Greeley, Colorado; Flagstaff, Arizona; and Las Cruces, New Mexico. When complete, the initiative will provide more than 2.3 million kilowatt-hours of renewable power annually and offset electricity consumption by approximately 50 percent.

SolarCity is a national leader in clean energy products and services.

“We will eliminate over 80 million pounds of annual carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent of taking approximately 7,000 cars off the road for a year,” said Ted Rollins, CEO of Campus Crest Communities.

“Sustainable living is central to our company philosophy and business practices, and we are pleased to find that our residents are equally as passionate about the concept.”Campus Crest

The company is proactively shifting consumption towards clean energy to be a leader in regenerative practices. Using renewable sources will limit carbon emissions and reduce overall energy costs providing residents with cleaner, more energy efficient housing.

These projects reflect Campus Crest’s commitment to sustainability and making a positive environmental, social, and economic impact on the communities in which it owns and operates student housing developments. To help drive this initiative, the company is partnering with The Institute for the Built Environment (IBE) at Colorado State University, a multidisciplinary institute whose mission is to foster stewardship and sustainability of natural and built environments, and the Center for Living Environments and Regeneration (CLEAR), a 501c(3) non-profit organization focused on global regeneration (www.clearrevolution.org).

“Campus Crest is showing future generations there are better energy options available by giving students access to renewable power,” said Toby Corey, Chief Revenue Officer at SolarCity. “It’s possible for many housing developers to pay less for solar electricity than they pay for utility power and pass on the benefits of clean power to their tenants—SolarCity has completed more than 100 solar projects for housing developments in the U.S.”

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Ted Rollins & Grove Green Team Celebrate Arbor Day

Ted Rollins & Grove Green Team Celebrate Arbor Day

Campus Crest CEO Ted Rollins and its Grove Green team kicked off a national green initiative to plant ‘urban forests’ at its properties. Over the next year, they will add one plant for every resident. “With 33 properties and 6 underway, with more than 17,000 beds, that means we have a lot of planting to do; it’s part of promoting dynamic ecosystems to help the environment,” said Rollins

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